Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Care Partner Wednesday--Your Christmas Story


I remember on Christmas morning, my mother would go down to the basement in her nightclothes and light the fireplace. Our tree sparkled with lights and tinsel, and the nativity scene that my father build from orange crates sat on the television. In this cozy glow, after eating a full breakfast, we opened our presents.

Most of us have some kind of memory that we'd like to recreate at Christmas. Family dinners, grandma's plum pudding, walks in the snow, singing carols...the list goes on. Each of us could complete the sentence, "Christmas isn't Christmas without __________."

As care partners, the problem comes with expectations, especially the unrealistic kind.

We may be able to accept that Grandma can no longer cook the turkey like she used to, but we can't conceive that she might not even enjoy attending. We're baffled when Aunt Rita is more excited about a box of tissues and a bottle of hand cream than the cashmere sweater we gave her. And how do you plan when grandpa doesn't remember the names of his grandchildren, and doesn't seem interested?

In your Christmas planning this year, it's important to keep some basic principles in mind.

This year may not be like any other year, and that's okay. It's important to take a long look at what you are expecting, and be willing to modify or give it up. Trying to re-create what you've always done can be a recipe for disaster. Grieve the traditions that matter to you, but be willing to give them up in order to have a peaceful, happy Christmas with you loved one.

Be realistic. In an incident that wasn't related to Christmas,  a family member was looking forward to seeing a movie that had just been released. She asked me if it would be worth trying to take her husband, who had advanced dementia. "Is this something you used to do together?" I asked. She replied that no, he'd never really enjoyed movies. I just looked at her, and without me saying a word, she came to the conclusion, "I guess he wouldn't now, either." Even if a Christmas activity used to be a favourite, that might have changed. Perhaps your loved one loved the bustle of having the family all around him, but can no longer tolerate large, noisy groups. Look at who they are today, and plan accordingly.

Simplify. You don't have to do it all. We put so much expectation on ourselves, almost to the point of ruining the holiday, in some instances. (Of course, this is true for people who aren't care partners, too.) Look at your loved one's abilities and desires, and choose a few activities that are almost sure to be a success. Did you and your mom used to bake together? Choose one or two recipes that are familiar and favourites, and make them together. Even if all she can do is stir or put ingredients you have measured in the bowl, you can share the experience, and the results.

Find the joyous moments. Years from now, all the family meals will melt together in your memory. You might not recall a single present, or what you baked from year to year, but the simple experience that lit up your loved one's face, few words of wisdom or funny quip will live in your memory forever. Spend time, not money or effort. Be together, love, sing and experience the joy of being with your elder.

People change. Circumstances change. Sometimes it's difficult, but we have to change with them. For a few years after my husband died, my son lived at home, and when it was time to get our live tree, he would help me. When he moved away for school, I came to the realization that, for the first time in my life, I needed to buy an artificial tree. It was a difficult decision, and I cried in the store, but after it was up, I realized how much simpler it was. No huge mess of needles to clean up. No expense after the original purchase. It was hard, but now I am sold.

Take back Christmas, and let it be your Christmas story, for you and the elder you love.

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Care Partner Wednesday--Your Christmas Story

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